Posted on July 6th, 2017 by wombwithaviewblog.com
I’ve received questions lately regarding where to find fetal sex or gender in an ultrasound report. Can you always find this information in a report?
The short answer? No, not always.
Actually, we mostly do not record fetal sex, and it’s mostly not important to your doc. Typically, fetal sex is not pertinent information to the examination. Though parents may desire it, physicians don’t need this determination to manage your care and that of your baby if both are healthy. The above is true for most general OB practitioners in the US. However, every physician practices a little differently, and one can certainly dictate if he or she wants this info on all patient reports (if possible to determine). The case may be different if you are seeing a high-risk OB doc, aka a perinatologist. Their reports consist of much greater detail and may possibly include a fetal sex/gender guess.

Example of a Blank Report

In the images of a sample report taken from a monitor, you’ll notice there is a whole host of blanks to fill, but fetal sex is not one of them. On the first page where you see Sex: Other, this refers to the patient. Patient demographics were not entered here, so the Sex option defaulted to Other. We always include your LMP or EDC/EDD – aka baby due date. The larger blue space would be filled with fetal measurements, estimates of gestational age, and fetal weight as they are obtained.

OB ultrasound report

OB ultrasound report
In the pages above, you’ll note the list of fetal organs and structures we attempt to document on a mid-pregnancy anatomy screen. We only fill out the section called BPP in the 3rd Trimester when your doc orders this particular examination. And the CVP is usually only filled out when performing a Fetal Echo or detailed heart examination.

Exception to the Rule

There always seems to be at least one exception to every rule. Because the responsibility of a sonographer is to search out structural malformations, we also have to report suspicions of abnormal external genitalia. In other circumstances, we may see particular abnormalities that we might group together, as in the case of certain syndromes. Sometimes, knowing fetal sex helps physicians either support or rule out a particular chromosomal or structural problem. Some of these are gender specific. In the pic below, we have a designated space on a Comments page to expound on our findings. We can add fetal sex here if we feel it is pertinent information to the findings.
OB ultrasound report
In some countries, fetal sex is neither reported nor discussed with parents due to the cultural preference of one sex over another. And some facilities are beginning to incorporate policies against providing parents with this news due to litigious reasons. Unfortunately, such is life in the good ol’ US. Facilities want to limit their liability for guessing incorrectly by simply not allowing their sonographers to guess at all.
So, if you don’t want to know your baby’s sex (or even if you do!), don’t expect your ultrasound report to disclose that information. Your sonographer creates the images and report. We only include what is needed and leave out what is not!
Best wishes for happy and healthy!
wwavblogger, RDMS
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Posted on October 20th, 2014 by wombwithaviewblog.com

We all know kids say some of the funniest things! And when Mom is 11 Weeks pregnant, Big Brother enters my ultrasound examination room with SO many questions!

We realize, as adults, just what a different perspective of life they have when, on hilarious occasion, they express to us these tiny pearls of realism in a way we never considered. They see the world in such simple terms; it’s unfortunate how we grow out of that over time. Oftentimes, we can actually see those mental wheels spinning, trying to make sense of the ultrasound monitor with their limited knowledge.

A Kid’s Precious Perspective

So, last week as I am scanning Mom, Big Brother of about 6 or 7 is watching intently. He was very excited to see “his” baby and had lots of questions about everything I was pointing out to him. I typically start with the head, try to demonstrate a great profile of the face and, of course, I make a point to include hands and feet. It takes a minute for older children to really appreciate that it’s a baby on the monitor. After all, that black and white and gray blob on the screen doesn’t look like any baby they’ve ever seen!

If I can obtain a decent shot of the arm and hand, I’ll annotate on the monitor “hi!!” and tell the excited on-lookers that Baby is waving to them. It’s just one of those fun aspects of my job and the reactions are always cute.

11 Weeks Pregnant, 11 Week Fetus

11 Week Fetus

As I did just that, Mom laughed. But Big Brother was quiet, and we could tell he was deep in thought. After a few seconds he finally spoke up and asked, “Mom, the baby can already spell?!!”

Mom and I had a great laugh over that, and Big Brother was happy to learn that his baby wasn’t smarter than him just yet!

**I would love to read YOUR funny stories.  Email me at wombviewerblog@gmail.com and tell me all about it!  Yours just may be my next post!

Thanks for reading!

wwavblogger, RDMS

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