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He says the decisions of white real estate agents and the proximity to public transportation may have been factors.

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Once African-American families started moving east of Troost, the population in the area grew. Play Live Radio. The homes primarily were built on speculation, and when the economy crashed incontractors and backers panicked. In addition, Nichols' restrictive covenants all but ensured blacks and Jews would not be able to move into the Country Club Plaza. At that time, many African-Americans worked and lived in the West Bottoms, but the second industrial revolution had brought an expansion of the railroad and commerce, driving residents out.

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Here is a stereopticon view from 9th and Hickory in An expansion in the West Bottoms of railroad and commerce left many African-Americans looking for homes elsewhere. Troost Avenue, once the eastern edge of Kansas City, Mo. But how did this street, which runs north-south through Kansas City, transition from "Millionaires Row" to socioeconomic divide?

The Country Club district In the decades before desegregation, there was another major player at work shaping the neighborhoods of Kansas City.

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See stories by Briana O'Higgins. The s were a period of economic boom for Kansas City and buildings and houses multiplied. Questionable real estate practices drove whites from their neighborhoods east of Troost to areas like the developing Country Club Plaza.

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Desperate for buyers, the home prices dropped, opening them up to the less-affluent African-American community. Blacks driven out, whites flee At that time, many African-Americans worked and lived in the West Bottoms, but the second industrial revolution had brought an expansion of the railroad and commerce, driving residents out.

This visualization of U. Census data shows Troost as a racial divider in Kansas City, Mo. Blue dots represent white residents, green dots represent African-American residents. In the decades before desegregation, there was another major player at work shaping the neighborhoods of Kansas City.

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Bythe most concentrated areas of African-Americans in Kansas City were east of Troost, though pockets remained directly west of Troost, north of 23rd Street and in the Westside. Lincoln High School and its feeder junior high schools offered the only post-elementary education to African-Americans. Special Project. Hey, thanks for reading. Real estate developer J. Nichols was instrumental in developing the Country Club Plaza, which still reigns as a major commercial part of Kansas City and the neighborhoods that surround the area.

If you have tips or story ideas for Beyond Our Borders, reach out to Laura Ziegler, community engagement reporter, lauraz kcur. Some, like Tanner Colby in his book, Some of my Best Friends are Black, argue Nichols orchestrated a "white flight" of sorts from the east side to his developments west of Troost by inducing "panic-selling" and blockbusting.

Prior to desegregation, Lincoln High School and its feeder junior high schools east of Troost offered the only post-elementary education to blacksfurther growing the population of African-American residents in jazz district now known as 18th and Vine. In her book, A City DividedSherry Lamb Schirmer writes that the s brought a widespread concern among whites about property values. Zoning ordinances were first established and passed by the city council inand though not entirely motivated by racism, those efforts helped keep blacks on the eastside.

Inthe all-white Kansas City, Missouri school board did not resist the Supreme Court ruling that ordered the desegregation of public schools. Troost was the most obvious border. Briana O'Higgins. But, writes Shortridge, the members did manipulate attendance boundaries to ensure white schools were separated from black schools. Donate Now. Related Content.

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Search Query Show Search. In the s, the land belonging to the Porters was sold off, beginning with the purchase of a swath of land at Troost by William A. As the Porter land was sold, moderately priced homes were built in the east on either side of the Paseo corridor. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn. All Streams. Your donation today keeps local journalism strong. According to a four-part series on Troost in the Kansas City African-American newspaper, The Call, panic selling and blockbusting were common in Kansas City up until at least Just after Nichols' death, major changes to the public schools in Kansas City, and across the nation, became the impetus to explicitly use Troost to divide the city.

The only option Once African-American families started moving east of Troost, the population in the area grew.

How troost became a major divide in kansas city

Show Search Search Query. According to Shortridge, it is still unclear why African-Americans bought in the area immediately east of Troost. Mansions, like this one belonging to Flavel Tiffany, established Millionaire's Row on Troost between 26th and 32nd streets.

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